HBW Insight is part of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them. Informa PLC’s registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

This copy is for your personal, non-commercial use. For high-quality copies or electronic reprints for distribution to colleagues or customers, please call +44 (0) 20 3377 3183

Printed By

UsernamePublicRestriction
UsernamePublicRestriction

Gilead's Global Logic

Executive Summary

Gilead plans to maximize the value of its newly-approved anti-HIV drug Viread by launching the product in all major world markets within a year-and by promoting it with the same look, messages and image everywhere. Gilead's campaign will make the point that its product helps patients' drug combinations work better, even if they're failing. By positioning the product this way, Gilead may avoid head-to-head competition with far bigger players. The company got into position to globally market Viread by acquiring NeXstar in 1999, then quickly re-organizing and filling out the very skinny marketing groups it inherited in major European markets. The relatively small company is betting that the cost efficiencies of global branding will bring it a better return on investment, and so help it grow a business that is already highly valued.

You may also be interested in...



Gilead's Bold Combo

Gilead is making a play to dominate the market for HIV treatments. It approached competing companies BMS and Merck about creating a triple-therapy well before the FDA suggested these three work together. Such an alliance directly threatens GSK. Gilead isn't just talking--it's running a head-to-head trial of a combination therapy featuring two of its drugs against another combo that includes Glaxo's. Positive data for Gilead would definitely power its bid to dominate the market.

Kos: Right-Sizing Expectations

Kos Pharmaceuticals has grown its lead product Niaspan, a form of the B vitamin niacin, into a $300 million product, mostly by marketing to cardiologists. The drug raises "good" cholesterol, and so is often prescribed in addition to statins that lower "bad" cholesterol. A recent co-promotion deal with Takeda will give the drug and a follow-on, Advicor, much more exposure in the primary care market, where the biggest pharma companies compete brutally. A vital step, or too little too late?

Kos: Right-Sizing Expectations

Kos Pharmaceuticals has grown its lead product Niaspan, a form of the B vitamin niacin, into a $300 million product, mostly by marketing to cardiologists. The drug raises "good" cholesterol, and so is often prescribed in addition to statins that lower "bad" cholesterol. A recent co-promotion deal with Takeda will give the drug and a follow-on, Advicor, much more exposure in the primary care market, where the biggest pharma companies compete brutally. A vital step, or too little too late?

Related Content

Topics

Related Companies

Related Deals

UsernamePublicRestriction

Register

IV001854

Ask The Analyst

Please Note: You can also Click below Link for Ask the Analyst
Ask The Analyst

Your question has been successfully sent to the email address below and we will get back as soon as possible. my@email.address.

All fields are required.

Please make sure all fields are completed.

Please make sure you have filled out all fields

Please make sure you have filled out all fields

Please enter a valid e-mail address

Please enter a valid Phone Number

Ask your question to our analysts

Cancel