HBW Insight is part of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them. Informa PLC’s registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

This copy is for your personal, non-commercial use. For high-quality copies or electronic reprints for distribution to colleagues or customers, please call +44 (0) 20 3377 3183

Printed By

UsernamePublicRestriction
UsernamePublicRestriction

PCPSA's 'No Harm' Standard Would Set High Bar For FDA Ingredient Review

This article was originally published in The Rose Sheet

Executive Summary

Regulatory consultants have concerns about the draft Personal Care Products Safety Act's proposed standard for FDA ingredient review – reasonable certainty of no harm. The standard's de facto application in FDA's review of new dietary ingredients in the supplement space has resulted in a fail rate of around 75%.

You may also be interested in...



California’s Toxic Free Cosmetics Act And The Case For Iconclad Federal Preemption

Limited to no federal preemption is included in cosmetics bills under consideration in the 116th Congress, which means that even if one were to pass in its current form, companies could still be at the mercy of states, typically California, imposing unique bans or restrictions on cosmetic ingredients.

In Time For Halloween, FDA Rule Conjures Up Specter Of Renewed Cosmetic Lead Debate

FDA’s final rule is specific to lead acetate’s use in hair-coloring products, but the agency’s recognition of current consensus – “that there is no safe exposure level for lead” – could spook the wider cosmetics industry, particularly given that some of the same NGO petitioners that drove the rulemaking are clamoring for an all-out ban on trace lead in lipsticks and externally applied cosmetics.

FDA Ban On Flavoring Ingredients Should Prompt Removal From Fragrances – WVE

The battle between hazard and risk ideologies goes on as NGO Women’s Voices for the Earth calls for the removal of five fragrance ingredients from personal-care products that FDA recently – if reluctantly – struck from its list of approved food additives. The agency maintains the substances pose no risk to public health.

Related Content

Topics

UsernamePublicRestriction

Register

RS019872

Ask The Analyst

Please Note: You can also Click below Link for Ask the Analyst
Ask The Analyst

Your question has been successfully sent to the email address below and we will get back as soon as possible. my@email.address.

All fields are required.

Please make sure all fields are completed.

Please make sure you have filled out all fields

Please make sure you have filled out all fields

Please enter a valid e-mail address

Please enter a valid Phone Number

Ask your question to our analysts

Cancel