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Kids’ Cosmetics With Talc Would Require Asbestos-Free Verification Or Warnings Under Dingell Bill

Executive Summary

Rep. Debbie Dingell, D-Mich., is taking another swing at legislation to require cancer warnings on talc-containing cosmetics marketed to children if they have not been determined asbestos-free via transmission electron microscopy to FDA’s satisfaction.

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US House Energy and Commerce Chair Frank Pallone took note on 16 January of the Environmental Working Group’s finding of asbestos contamination in a “Princess” makeup set intended for young girls. Rep. Debbie Dingell, D-MI, will speak to the test results first, pushing her own legislation that would require asbestos testing of talc-containing children’s cosmetics in accordance with preferred methods.

FDA To Hold Public Meeting In February on Cosmetic Talc-Asbestos Test Methods

Recommendations from an FDA-led interagency work group regarding methods for detecting and measuring asbestos in talc and talc-containing cosmetics will be presented at the agency’s planned public meeting in Silver Spring, MD, on 4 February. The recommendations are summarized in the FDA's meeting notice, which follows contentious cosmetic product recalls based on asbestos findings.

Imagining A US Where ‘Clean At Sephora’ Is De Facto Law

NGO-backed legislation at US federal, state and local levels to ban cosmetic ingredients and contain contaminant levels would be largely gratuitous if all cosmetics brands were compelled to be “Clean at Sephora.” For now, companies’ adherence to Sephora’s and peers’ green/clean chemistry principles remains voluntary, but retailers’ role as surrogate regulators seems only to be gaining in strength. 

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