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Widely Available Unapproved Hangover Remedies Concern US FDA As Encouraging Overindulgence

Agency Warns Seven Firms In Market Offering Myriad Options

Executive Summary

As CFSAN warned seven marketers, supplement products from numerous other businesses advertised as hangover remedies, or as formulations to prevent symptoms associated with overindulgence, remained available to US consumers. Like one business FDA warned, numerous companies are offering OTC intravenous treatments for hangovers, available at locations accepting walk-in or by-appointment customers.

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