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Prominent FDAer In Cosmetic Modernization Talks On Way Out

This article was originally published in The Rose Sheet

Executive Summary

Michael Taylor retires as deputy commissioner for foods and veterinary medicine on June 1, leaving behind a legacy of regulatory work under the Food Safety Modernization Act of 2010. Taylor also was a key figure in the agency's past negotiations with industry on a legislative plan to modernize cosmetics oversight, and his departure could be felt by FDA and other stakeholders if current legislation of that nature passes.

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