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Limiting Sport Supplement Sales To Minors Recommended By More Researchers

This article was originally published in The Rose Sheet

Executive Summary

More than two-thirds of health food stores’ staff recommended creatine to researchers posing as teen athletes, results that researchers say should prompt pediatricians and retailers to educate young people on the risk of creatine and push states to ban sales of the substance to minors.

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Adding 20% Tax Would Curb Abuse Of OTC Drugs For Trimming Pounds, Research Suggests

National Eating Disorders Association-funded study projects tax would reduce purchases 10.3% for households with female children and 5.2% for all families. “Abuse of widely available, over-the-counter drugs and supplements such as diet pills, laxatives and diuretics by adolescents for weight control is well documented, yet manufacturers and retailers can sell them to minors without restriction,” says study author Bryn Austin of Harvard Medical School.

Adding 20% Tax Would Curb Abuse Of OTC Drugs For Trimming Pounds, Research Suggests

National Eating Disorders Association-funded study projects tax would reduce purchases 10.3% for households with female children and 5.2% for all families. “Abuse of widely available, over-the-counter drugs and supplements such as diet pills, laxatives and diuretics by adolescents for weight control is well documented, yet manufacturers and retailers can sell them to minors without restriction,” says study author Bryn Austin of Harvard Medical School.

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