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Animal Groups Await Ombudsman Word On Testing At REACH/Cosmetics Interface

This article was originally published in The Rose Sheet

Executive Summary

Can data derived from animal testing under the EU’s REACH regulation be used to support product safety under the Cosmetics Regulation? European authorities say that in many cases it can be, but PETA is pressing the ombudsman to address what it views as maladministration, an issue that a coalition of its peers has raised as well.

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