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Sale Of CBD Flower And Leaf Up To 0.3% THC Legal, French High Court Decides

Executive Summary

Having no psychotropic effect and not causing addiction, CBD flowers and leaves cannot be considered a narcotic, the French high court rules, delivering its final verdict on last year's ban by the country's Ministry of Solidarity and Health. 

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CBD Supplements, Teas And Flowers Up To 0.3% THC Allowed In France, For Now

France's Ministry of Solidarity and Health published a decree allowing the commercial sale of cannabis sativa extracts with a maximum THC content up to 0.3%, but banning the sale of raw cannabis flowers and leaves to consumers in all their forms, thus elimating a booming CBD market for tea, for example. The ban, however, has been halted by France's highest administrative court on the basis that it is disproportionate. While the Conseil d’Etat makes its final decision, French bricks-and-mortar and online CBD retailers can continue selling low-THC cannabis flowers and leaves.

Highest European Court Rules CBD Is Not A Narcotic Drug

The European Court of Justice rules that CBD cannot be regarded as a narcotic as it is non-psychoactive and suggests that a French ban on the cannabinoid is contrary to EU law on the free movement of goods. Legal experts and industry hope the judgment will pave the way for a regulated European CBD market.

OTC Shortages Top Of Mind For North American, European and Asia Pacific Consumers

An overwhelming majority of consumers surveyed by IT consultancy Capgemini are concerned they will not be able to obtain the OTC health products they require or want. In the event of shortages – which are currently affecting consumers across Europe – many respondents said they would substitute with another brand, or in some cases not purchase at all.

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